Michel De Vroey’s Essential Book, Part II

This post continues last week’s admiration of Michel De Vroey. He understands, and confidently champions, the EK emphasis on involuntary unemployment and, consequently, the analytic centrality assigned in stabilization-relevant macro theory to meaningful wage rigidity (MWR) and the discretionary management … 
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Misunderstood Efficiency-Wage Theory

 

A costly misunderstanding. Efficiency wages, particularly the original morale-centric formulation that Solow and I pioneered, outlined how theorists could have gone about rationally disabling Keynes’s Second Classical Postulate (i.e., the equality between the market wage and the marginal disutility of … 
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Gary Becker, Nobel Laureate

This post acknowledges another patron saint of the GEM Project. In 1992, Gary Becker of the University of Chicago was awarded the 1992 Nobel Prize “for having extended the domain of microeconomic analysis to a wide range of human behaviour … 
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Routinized Jobs

 

Is anybody excited about a post entitled “Routinized Jobs”? But boring employment is a key part of modern macroeconomic landscapes that is almost uniquely modeled in the GEM Project. I just finished reading Seasonal Associate by Heike Geissler, an “autobiographical … 
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The Big Picture

Macro theorists have understandably experimented with a variety of paradigms in the attempt to explain the periodic instability of modern highly-specialized economies. Contrasting two conflicting paradigms has been a recurrent theme of the GEM Project Blog. The first is mainstream … 
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Top Billing

 

The GEM Project insists that the top priority in modern macroeconomic research is unchanged from the Early Keynesians. It continues to be figuring out how to microfound meaningful wage rigidity, which by definition rationally suppresses labor-price recontracting. MWR is a … 
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The One True Wage Rigidity Model

As promised last week, this post looks at some of the insightful, little known evidence that supports my claim that the GEM Project’s explanation of wage determination is how labor is actually priced in ubiquitous information-challenged workplaces. The Project’s narrative … 
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